Traditional Food in The Philippines

Filipino food, like the Filipinos themselves, is diverse in many ways. Taking ideas from the East and West, Filipino food is strongly influenced by Chinese, Spanish and American traditions. You could say that Filipino food was one of the first cuisines to fuse flavors from different parts of the world, which we now term, fusion cuisine.

The Philippines, being surrounded by water, are blessed to have such fresh seafood and fertile soil. Having an abundance of rice patties, a typical Filipino meal consists of rice eaten with a variety of different dishes.

When the Spanish first colonized the Philippines, they introduced many new flavors and dishes including Paella. The Filipinos took local ingredients such as chilies, coconuts and fish sauce and fused it with Spanish flavors such as olive oil, paprika and saffron. Filipinos, being the creative souls they are, combined these ingredients and flavors and came up with their own dish, silog, which is fried rice topped with meat and a fried egg. Silog is known for its sensational combination of flavors and it is the inspiration behind many of the dishes at Sari Sari Store in Grand Central Market.

Later on, the Philippines became a colony of the United States which brought about hamburgers and fried chicken, adding yet another layer of food fusion. Not to be mistaken, Filipino food might take influences from many different cultures, but the layer of flavors is entirely its own.

Today, you’ll find dishes such as Adobo (chicken or pork braised in vinegar, soy sauce and other spices), Lechón (whole roasted pig) and Arroz Caldo (creamy rice porridge). The unique fusion of flavors showcase the rich cultural history behind the Philippines. And like many rich cultures, food is often at the forefront of many Filipino celebrations and we hope to continue that tradition at Sari Sari Store.